US # CHIP HOUSE :: net zero energy for 260,000 $

More than a “ecofriendly” home :: net zero energy !

CHIP (“Compact Hyper-Insulated Prototype”) is a comfortable, well-organized house that utilizes a bevy of high-tech systems to maintain a high degree of energy efficiency and teach residents about their power use.

CHIP was built by the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and sponsored by Hanwha Solar.

It was one of the most creative entries into the 2011 Solar Decathlon

VIDEO ::

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4TvesXV_Yg

all the project ::

http://www.chip2011.com/

00 chip house ext 00b  abraham_garcia-Chip-house 01 ca_model-300x196 02 chip house day 03 chip house ext4 04 chip house ext night 05 chip house ext abraham_garcia-CHIP 06 chip house ext3 07 chip house ext5 08 chip house garden 09 chip house out1 10 sunny CHIP house 575 10b chip house plan2 10c chip house int_program1 10d chip house int_program2 11a chip house drawings2 11b chip house drawnings1 11c chip house envelop ext_puft1 11c chip house envelop ext_puft2 12a chip house ext_chip1 12b chip house ext_chip2 12c chip house ext_chip3 13a chip house ext_skin1 13b chip house ext_skin2 13c chip house ext_skin 14a chip house ext_tuft_hw 14b chip house ext_tufts 14c chip house isolation jeans 15a chip house structure 15ab chip house ext_shape 15ab chip house int_plan 15b chip house structure sci 15c chip-house-solar-decathlon-2011-8-537x387 15d chip house water 15e chip house resized_californiaselisabethneigertchiphouse 15f chip house solar 16 chip house spaces 16a CHIP house inside SolarDecathlon 16AA chip-house-solar-kinect-3 16ab iOS-Simulator-Screen-shot-Sep-24-2011-11.22.34-AM-657x492 16b chip house bathroom 16ba chip house spaces ins 16bc chip house spaces in 16bd chip house kitchen 16c chip house bedroom 16d chip house inside 3 16e chip house home_interior 16f chip house inside furniture 16g chip house chairs-stacked-395 16h chip house furniture3 16i chip house furniture2 17a chip house inside 2 17b chip house inside people 17c chip house inside1 17c chip house terrasse 17d chip house inside people2 18a chip house soft-read-1-300x200 18b chip house out2 18c chip house night

abraham_garcia-Chip-house

powered by solar energy, controlled with Xbox Kinec

The CHIP House  was started with the goal of creating a net-zero energy home (i.e. one that requires no external energy source), and it looks like the designers exceeded that target. The house actually generates three times as much energy as it uses thanks to solar panels and a host of energy saving measures.

Heat generated by the air conditioning is used to make hot water, natural light can be used at most hours of the day, and the whole house’s design and ventilation system allow for the temperature to be adjusted quickly and with minimal energy usage. The CHIP House’s most striking feature is the insulation fitted around the entire 750-square foot home, which makes it look like a giant mattress but also preserves the interior temperature.

The incredibly energy efficient design would make the house stand out on its own, but the integrated motion controls and smart features push the CHIP House above your typical green-conscious home and into “home of the future” material. An Xbox Kinect system tracks residents in the house, allowing them to turn appliances and lights on and off just by pointing at them. The Kinect also monitors their location and turns lights off as they exit one area and on as they move into another.

http://www.gizmag.com/chip-house-solar-energy-xbox-kinect/21254/

—–

In what can only be described as a truly “out of the box” approach to the design of the house (pun intended), the SCI-Arc/Caltech team has wrapped the polygonal house in a “skin” that acts as what the team refers to as “outsulation.” This skin is a system of cellulose-filled batts fastened in layers to the outside surface of the roof (underneath the house’s 235-W photovoltaic panels) and exterior walls. This forms a shell, which is wrapped in airtight and water-resistant, architectural-grade, polymer-coated vinyl.

Inside the house, the team has designed a stepped interior, which is divided into a series of platforms terraced upward and inward from most public to most private. The CHIP team is taking its house to new levels—the top and outermost of which serves as the bedroom, where upon awakening the occupant experiences a downhill  progression via each level, which are bed/groom/dress/eat/live/work, and then backward in the evening.

In addition to the solar panels on the roof of the house, CHIP is filled with technologies that reduce its energy footprint. One innovative technology inside the house is the thermal integration between the HVAC heat pump, which extracts heat from the interior of the house, and the domestic hot water heat pump, which dumps heat into hot water. By using the waste heat from the air-source heat pump to heat hot water, the team says the house will see “tremendous energy savings while fully satisfying air conditioning and hot water demands.”

Photo of a group of people standing in front of a large, white quilted structure.

Other energy-saving technologies include a lighting strategy that takes full advantage of natural sunlight through solar tubes and light louvers and uses energy-saving LEDs and CFLs during nighttime hours. CHIP also has a state-of-the-art home automation system that is able to monitor every watt of electricity used by the house and then visually communicate the information to its occupants. CHIP is even connected to the Internet, which means the house can receive weather-forecast information, which allows it to predict cloudy skies and conserve power generated by its solar panels during peak sunlight hours. The team says this system plays a central role in “optimizing the behavior of the house” and is able to “control operation of the active thermal mass, shutting down appliances or lights that are no longer used, and gives the occupants an instant understanding of their energy use and, in turn, their energy bill.”

http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1028

Textes and Images ::

http://inhabitat.com/sci-arc-caltechs-solar-decathlon-chip-house-is-a-crazy-inside-out-prefab/sci-arccaltech-solar-decathlon-2011-construction-drawings/?extend=1

http://greenpassivesolar.com/2011/12/modernist-living-net-zero-chip-house/

http://www.sciarc.edu/portal/about/solar_decathlon/chip2011.html

http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1028

http://www.dexigner.com/news/24504

http://www.solidform.co.uk/blog/2011/11/7/chip-house-efficient-building-envelope-strategy.html

http://www.gizmag.com/chip-house-solar-energy-xbox-kinect/21254/

__________________________________Extracts __________________________________________

EXTERIOR :: EFFICIENT BUILDING ENVELOPE STRATEGY

CHIP’S Architectural concept is driven by the two sides of the net zero equation: energy production and energy consumption. CHIP’s design is both responsive to the sun in its orientation and massing, while simultaneously expressing the performative duties of its envelope with respect to energy conservation.

The most singular feature of the design is CHIP’s unique exterior envelope strategy: A skin and insulation assembly which turns conventional wisdom on its head, wearing its thermal performance “on its sleeve.” Separating the structural members from the insulating layer, and wrapping the insulation assembly in a flexible vinyl membrane gives CHIP an exterior envelope with the extremely high R-values necessary for a net-zero house, at a significantly reduced cost, while indexing this performance in its physical appearance.

Working with a modified cube shape, the team utilized a creative and sustainable means of adding insulation to the outside of the structure in order to utilize more living space inside the structure.

chip house day

INSIDE DESIGN

CHIP’s flexible, stepped interior adopts the ethic of “doing-more-with-less”, allowing a single, continuous volume to perform in a variety of different ways to serve the occupants daily needs. The program is divided into a series of platforms which are terraced upward and inwards, from the most public to most private. The distribution of program from north-to-south, and high-to-low, facilitates the occupants’ daily rhythms: a progression downhill in the morning in the form of sleep/groom/dress/eat/live – and vice versa in the evening.

The interior aesthetic and features were designed with the “active Californian” in mind, engaging the occupant, allowing him to interact and customize the space. East interior wall is a canvas of interchangeable cabinets and soft furniture configurable upon occupant needs. Overhead shelf beams serves addition storage options. Bathroom is designed as a wet room featuring swingable wood plank flooring which opens up to reveal a stainless steel bathtub. To live in CHIP means to live with CHIP.

chip house home_interior

http://www.solidform.co.uk/blog/2011/11/7/chip-house-efficient-building-envelope-strategy.html

The Layout

The home’s main living areas can be seen in the diagram.

The CHIP House has different living areas located in different levels of the house.  The different levels create distinctive living areas without the presense of walls.

The shared living areas are located in the lower portions of the home while the most private area, the bedroom, is located at the highest, most elevated section of the 700 square foot home.

The layout is an efficient one with the systems that use water in close proximity.  In the diagram to the left, they are contained in the grey area, denoted with a fork and knife and running water icon.

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Currently ranking in at number 8, the net zero prefab heralds a new generation of high-tech solar powered housing. The CHIP (which stands for “Compact Hyper-Insulated Prototype”) impressed us with its compact, puzzle-like interior, which allows for maximum flexibility within the 750 square foot home. The living spaces are built on a series of fiveplatforms that become more private as one ascends into the space – the top floor holds the bedroom. In a feat of organization, soft modular chairs fit together to be tucked away in custom wall holsters, and a removable table saves space. The kitchen even holds a snowboard, which doubles as a decorative element above the sink.

CHIP’s boxy shape and slanted roof were designed to maximize solar collection. The unique outer insulation reminds us of a winter coat in appearance as well as in function – it keeps the inside protected from the elements while providing an uncomplicated waterproofing system. It also allows more living space in the interior than would be possible with insulated walls.

The element of the CHIP House that is generating the most buzz with visitors at the Solar Decathlon is its personal energy management technology, including the iPad app eGauge which allows residents to monitor, and therefore maintain or decrease their energy usage, and the XBox Kinect system which is hooked up to the lights and home entertainment, allowing users to control these devices with hand gestures.

It provides detailed information on the energy consumption of the house and the effects of all the home’s energy saving features, which include a holistic heating and cooling system, wastewater recycling, low-flush toilets, and a 7.8 kW photovoltaic system. The house is also outfitted with a Control4 system that turns off lights when no one is home, runs the drip irrigation system during dry weather, and even closes blinds to shade the home.

CHIP is a comfortable, well-organized house that utilizes a bevy of high-tech systems to maintain energy efficiency and teach residents about their power use. It’s a refreshingly unique design in a sea of rectangular Solar Decathlon boxes, and we hope CHIP’s innovative details inspire architects and homeowners to dream up new possibilities in home design.

1) Architecture and design

cf :: http://www.chip2011.com/design.html#Architecture

CHIP’S Architectural concept is driven by the two sides of the net zero equation: energy production and energy consumption. CHIP’s design is both responsive to the sun in its orientation and massing, while simultaneously expressing the performative duties of its envelope with respect to energy conservation.

The most singular feature of the design is CHIP’s unique exterior envelope strategy: A skin and insulation assembly which turns conventional wisdom on its head, wearing its thermal performance “on its sleeve.” Separating the structural members from the insulating layer, and wrapping the insulation assembly in a flexible vinyl membrane gives CHIP an exterior envelope with the extremely high R-values necessary for a net-zero house, at a significantly reduced cost, while indexing this performance in its physical appearance.

CHIP’s flexible, stepped interior adopts the ethic of “doing-more-with-less”, allowing a single, continuous volume to perform in a variety of different ways to serve the occupants daily needs. The program is divided into a series of platforms which are terraced upward and inwards, from the most public to most private. The distribution of program from north-to-south, and high-to-low, facilitates the occupants’ daily rhythms: a progression downhill in the morning in the form of sleep/groom/dress/eat/live – and vice versa in the evening.

The interior aesthetic and features were designed with the “active Californian” in mind, engaging the occupant, allowing him to interact and customize the space. East interior wall is a canvas of interchangeable cabinets and soft furniture configurable upon occupant needs. Overhead shelf beams serves addition storage options. Bathroom is designed as a wet room featuring swingable wood plank flooring which opens up to reveal a stainless steel bathtub. To live in CHIP means to live with CHIP.

STRUCTURAL DESIGN

CHIP’s structural designs strikes a balance between the unique geometries of CHIP’s massing and affordability. As with other design elements, the structural design seeks to accomplish its objectives (a simple modular assembly which enables the appearance of a uniform building) in a robust, low-tech fashion, using as many elements from typical Type-V light wood framing construction as possible. Working in collaboration with the engineers at Buro Happold, redundant and unnecessary structure from Type-V assemblies were removed where possible in order to deliver a lighter, more efficient building. The result is a unique structure that uses every-day construction methods to lower the overall cost of construction and transport, while enabling a stable platform for the house’s other design elements.

More about structural designBack to Top

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

CHIP’s electrical system is designed to be as simple as possible while still carrying out important house functions at as low of a cost as possible. The photovoltaic (PV) system is designed to meet CHIP’s energy needs using modules over the structure at an ideal tilt. Hanwha Solar PV panels are laid out as needed on over a angled PV rack on the roof which holds up to 45 panels. Through the use of module maximizers and specialized wiring series CHIP maximize PV panel output and reduces energy loss in wiring.

The lighting design is baed on uncompromising quality while using as little energy as possible used LED-type lighting fixtures. Using the Control4 interface, four layers of interior light can be controlled from anywhere in the house. The wireless switches remove the need for complicated 3-way switching.

More about home technologyBack to Top

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

CHIP’s HVAC(heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) and water systems is designed to maximize energy saving over a typical year of operation in California while leveraging thermal synergy between the two systems. In the house’s design climate, the large majority of HVAC loads are manifested in cooling loads. The core of the system is a thermal storage water tank that acts as both a thermal mass and a heat transfer medium. With the high heat capacity of water, the thermal mass efficiently extracts heat from the HVAC system with a minimum of energy use. In addition, the heated thermal mass preheats the domestic hot water, thus maximizing the combines efficiency of the two systems. In addition, the HVAC system makes use of simple cheap, yet cost-effective technologies that reduce energy use by taking advantage of the California climate. Economizers and whole-house fans substantially reduce cooling demand in the summer and improve occupant comfort at minimal cost and energy consumption.

More about home technologyBack to Top

COMPUTING SYSTEMS

CHIP’s the computing system is much like the central nervous system of the human body; not only can it process and monitor the state of the house, but it can react to changes in the environment as well. The computing system is made up of 4 distinct but interrelated components:

  1. Energy Monitoring The energy use of the house is monitored at a whole house level as well as at an individual circuit level. Using eGuage Monitoring hardware, we can determine where the energy from our PV panels are being used.
  2. Control4: Home Automation Nearly all the lights and appliances in the house are hooked up to the Control4 via a Zigbee network. This allows for one centralized location at which every device can be controlled.
  3. Prediction and Planning Data is polled from Internet weather forecasting sites as well as SolarAnywhere to determine that state of energy usage and generation by the HVAC and PV array. This information is passed to a planning algorithm, which then calculates the most effect use of the energy.
  4. Home Interface The Home Interface is a system using Apple iPad and XBOX 360’s Kinect. Custom Ipad Apps are written to provide a “universal remote” that not only allows devices to be controlled, but can display the state of each device and the energy draw of the house. With the Kincet, a custom software package that allows users to control devices in the home using natural gestures such as pointing and waving.

2) The exterior architecture

THE SHAPE

CHIP’s shape begins as a primitive box, which is then faceted in several dimensions. The first facet negotiates between an optimal roof angle for year-round solar energy collection, and a comfortable, vaulted interior space. Further faceting of the primitive shrinks and torques the plan to minimize the building’s footprint on the exterior, while accommodating the programmatic needs of the occupant on the interior.

chip house ext_chip1 chip house ext_chip2 chip house ext_chip3

THE ENVELOPE

CHIP turns the conventional wall assembly inside out. A soft fabric exterior expresses the character of a thick insulation layer that helps CHIP conserve energy. This inversion results in a counter intuitive, yet surprisingly plausible and affordable design. While the unconventional exterior may seem unique for a house, it is created through the use of the most standard of construction materials. The soft skin is seamed as a whole and attached from top to bottom. The use of the skin eliminates the need for the complicated waterproofing systems found in conventional building envelopes. Like a sock the fabric is unrolled and stretched around the insulated frame.

chip house envelop ext_puft1 chip house envelop ext_puft2 chip house enveloppe ext_puft1

chip house ext_skin

THE SKIN

CHIP’s skin is made of heavy-weight (24oz/yrd) vinyl manufactured by Naizil. Vinyl is a recycled material that is resistant to tear and extremely durable. Like any fabric for clothing, a pattern was designed and cut for CHIP to wear. White vinyl was used to reflect as much of solar radiation as possible, reducing cooling load.

chip house ext_skin1 chip house ext_skin2

TUFTS

The tufting of the skin enhances the puffy look of the house. This effect is achieved with hardware consisting of a threaded bolt, nuts and rubber washers that tie the insulation and skin back to the plywood shell. Vinyl coated cables hook and slalom around the tuft bolts creating CHIP’s unique quilted exterior.

chip house ext_tufts chip house ext_tuft_hw

Outsulation

A 7.2 kW array provides electricity to the house. Photo Credit: Eduardo Castilho of Ideiasdefora.com

The puffy-looking outer layer resembles the same look as puffy-down jacket on a person.  The soft look is created from the protective covering of the house that protects the puffy insulation, made in part from recycled blue jeans.

The structure is covered by a white vinyl-coated fabric.  Where does one get this type of fabric?  It is the same material used for outdoor billboards.  The material has a low cost and is built to withstand the blazing sun and other outside elements.

Active Solar

The CHIP home has a 7.2 kW array on the southern facing roof of the house.  The photovoltaic panels are situated at an ideal angle for electricity production.  While every location will have a slightly different optimal solar angle, the panels on top of the sloping home performed well in Washington D.C., achieving net-zero status in the Energy Balance Category.  (The photo to the right was taken by Eduardo Castilho of Ideiasdefora.com.)

INSIDE

The bathroom is tucked away on the side of the home between the bedroom and kitchen.  Accessed through a sliding door, the ingenious layout includes all the regular amenities and includes the luxury of a sunken bathtub.

Both the kitchen and clothes washing machine are located on opposite sides of the bathroom, keeping the water pipes and plumbing efficient and in close proximity.

The home has many electronic and creative features built into the home.  See the surround-sound electronic speaker tucked away near the ceiling?

Notice the green chair in front of the sliding pocket doors of the restroom? The furniture in the CHIP Solar Decathlon home project was also student designed and can be neatly tucked away in areas throughout the house.

The use of white cabinetry and light wood give the house an airy and open feel.

After sitting in the comfy green chairs…

… they are designed to stack neatly into the wall.

This Solar Decathlon entry is a wholistic system with strong student participation.  The furniture systems in the CHIP House were also designed by students.

The chairs could be enjoyed to lounge on the deck, used entertain guests or used to relax and read a book in the study.

After using the chairs, they stack neatly back into their storage space in the wall, transforming itself into a form of artwork.

The kitchen table can be seen in the gallery below and can be moved throughout the kitchen area or used to extend the higher area above the kitchen.

dsc00640The home has two main ramp accessible entrances on each side of the kitchen.  The photo was taken near one entrance, looking toward the other one.

The home rises to the left hand side of the picture toward the bathroom, dressing and bedroom platforms, while to the right of the picture, the home lowers to the study and entertainment areas.

A projector is used to provide entertainment instead of a television screen.

Because of the layout of the house is an open one, with the different levels of the house creating a sense of boundaries, movement through the house occurs through the center.

The lowest section of the home is a study space and entertainment area.

A projector is utilized instead of a television.   A screen descends from the wall opposite of the projector and movies or television shows can entertain the occupants.

The is also a system for utilizing the water that falls on the roof.

The sloping roof of the CHIP House is also ideal for rainwater catchment. The team devised a ingenious metal grate that both extends the deck space, while it also is a catchment that collects rainwater in a storage tank.

It provides water for the plants located to the side of the house. A water sensor is used to determine if the plants are dry, and if so, will send water to the plants from the tank. The water collection system was also designed and built by the students.

Two members of the Exterior Team, Hyungbin Im and Mike Nesbit take time away from the tours for a picture.

The CHIP House was one of my favorites in the 2011 Solar Decathlon.  It was evident that the team put a lot of collaborative design intelligence and creativity into the home.

The Solar Decathlon homes that had this type of active student inspiration were especially enjoyable to tour because the ingenuity and the pride of the project showed through in the elegance and creativity of not only the features of the competition home, but also within the students who explained the different processes that they worked to create.

Some of the other Solar Decathlon entries subcontracted out various aspects of the building process, while others rented furniture or had it donated from a furniture company.  Others, like this cool project had student ownership throughout the project as the walls, insulation, furniture, piping, end even artwork were all student made.  These differences in participation create subtle differences within the final project while the sense of ownership and pride can be sensed when touring the homes.

Lasting friendships and professional networks are established when participating in the Solar Decathlon.

Take a look at the photo gallery and video below to get more angles and information about the CHIP House :: http://greenpassivesolar.com/2011/12/modernist-living-net-zero-chip-house/

The CHIP House came in 6th at the 2011 Solar Decathlon ::  3rd place in affordability, 2nd place in engineering, 6th place overall.

Affordability :

“the contest awards the teams that were able to most closely achieve a total construction cost of $250,000.
This includes materials and labor.

We are very proud to announce that CHIP came in 3rd place with a total cost of $262,495.11

Not only is this an exciting development for our team (as we climb the leader board), but it is also a definitive statement about the power of design. We entered this competition with the conviction that affordable design need not be banal and lifeless. This was one of our primary challenges. We believed strongly that design can transcend the assumption that being cheap=looking cheap. We wanted to use this platform of the Solar Decathlon to manifest this conviction and we have done so with inarguably the most innovative house on the block.” (http://www.chip2011.com/blog/)

The house is not just a solar house, a passive house, or an efficient house. It is truly a net-zero energy home. We didn’t design it to simply generate enough electricity to meet an average home user’s demand. We designed it to consume less energy and generate enough under any weather conditions at DC. This showed in the final energy balance results, where we along with only six other teams reach net-zero energy in a brutal nine days of competition when the sun shone through the clouds for maybe one afternoon. We took a look at everything that consumed energy and said to ourselves how can they consume less. As the result, our house operated differently during the competition. While majority of other houses shut down all non-essential systems and some essential ones to save energy, we continued to wash and dry our laundry, maintain the indoor temperature and humidity, and perform all other measured tasks with a clear understanding and trust in our systems that we would be net-zero-energy at the end of the competition. We were so confident of how much energy we would be using and generating that even during public tours we continued to demonstrate our Kinect and iPad home control systems. CHIP proved that a home can be net-zero without sacrifices.

The house is not the competition’s winner. It is tomorrow’s home. Whether or not we intended this to be our primary goal at the onset of the project, CHIP pushed every single boundary of tomorrow’s home living. We made a lot of design decisions knowing full well that they might not benefit us per se at the competition, but they were the right things to do because that was our vision of tomorrow. We put the insulation on the outside, because we think this is how every other home in America should be constructed. We broke a two-story house into four pieces, because we want to show everyone that a modular house doesn’t have to look like a trailer. We developed the most complete, functional, and advanced home control interface and backbone, because we think every homeowner should have the control of their home literally at their finger tips. Some of those decisions benefited us in the eyes of competition jurors. Others did not. One thing is for sure, all the kids walking through our house had the same sparkle in their eyes as they do on Christmas Day. Maybe, they are our tomorrow.” (http://www.chip2011.com/blog/)

The whole project is the result of over two years work by more than 100 students and a partnership between Caltech and SCI-Arc. It took about US$1 million to develop, but producing a duplicate would cost around US$300,000.

domotic /

The house also includes other automatic features like closing the shades if you start a movie or the house begins to get warm, turning certain devices on when you sit in specific chairs, and gradually turning the lights on in the morning for a more natural start to the day. It even has smartphone compatibility so the lights and AC can be controlled while you’re away by simply tapping on a virtual floorplan.

CONCLUSION OF THE TEAM ::

The SCI-Arc/Caltech proposal is unique because, conceptually, it is what it is because it does what it does.
The designers have rejected any obligations to the box and shed precedents.
That’s SCI-Arc’s tactical approach.
Rather than subscribe to the standard imagery,  SCI-Arc designed and Caltech engineered the CHIP prototype premised on the notion that if we re-organized the social order of the house, if we re-imagined the role of energy, insulation, and material choices, and if we re-invented the standard electrical, mechanical, and structural engineering priorities we would disrupt the traditional image of the American house, and produce a very different object.

Indeed, in the end SCI-Arc and Caltech have really taken on the question of livability in American housing and offered a new sensibility for both its content and its character.

The CHIP is a welcome address to an alternative housing future.”

(http://www.chip2011.com/blog/)

—-

FOOLOW UP :: SOLAR DECATHLON 2013

http://www.sciarc.edu/portal/about/solar_decathlon/index.html

TEAM SCI-ARC:CALTECH solar decat 2013 TEAM SCI-ARC:CALTECH solar decat 2013b

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